Is The Zero Carb-diet Right For You?

Most people have been keen on what they take into their bodies lately. A zero-carb diet has become an adaptation for many. They believe that the diet is a magical way of shedding off weight, taming abnormal desire for certain foods, and keeping a healthy body.

A zero-carb diet is not as friendly as other diets that allow you to have scarce starch portions. This diet prohibits any intake of carbohydrates. However, the essence of carbs in the body can’t be ignored since they play a significant role in keeping people’s bodies energetic and ensuring their brains are okay.

Before embracing a zero-carb diet, nutritionists advise people to be gradual on it. Cutting carbohydrates at once could lead to issues like adverse mood swings and low energy levels. Also, they are advised on the essence of understanding their bodies, especially those with conditions.

Despite the many arguments surrounding the zero-carb diet, health specialists have confirmed that it is healthful to stick to the diet. Weight loss is the most significant benefit of this diet. Low carbs are good at getting rid of excess water and reducing the sugar in the body. This action translates to weight loss without extreme feelings of hunger.

Many lifestyle diseases are associated with excess weight. Among them are cardiovascular problems, which may lead to the inability to get involved in many activities. Another common condition attracted by too much weight is diabetes. After digestion, carbohydrates become glucose, which means that too much glucose will increase insulin, which is simply diabetes. Therefore, a zero carb-diet significantly curbs these diseases, thus keeping you healthy.

Generally, experts say that Zero-carb diets are okay for people, especially those with obesity. However, they argue that women that are in the child-bearing stage should go slow on it. The reason for the argument is that a Zero-carb diet might interfere with their reproductive hormones. This interference may lead to a delay in their giving birth or even cause them to be barren.

A zero-carb diet has worked for many people with a few registering manageable side effects. They affirm that the effects are nothing compared to the benefits that come with the diet. Anyone who wants to embark on the diet must avoid baked foods, junks, sugary cereals, grains, and starchy vegetables. However, it’s wise for them to visit a health and nutrition expert for further guidance.

The Health Benefits of Tapioka

If you are looking for gluten-free starch, you should opt for tapioca. Numerous health benefits come about when you consume tapioca. The only issue is that tapioca’s nutrients may be lost during the manufacturing process. Nevertheless, numerous brands will advertise the health benefits of tapioca. Some of the health benefits that are associated with tapioca include:

1. Tapioca Is Good for Individuals with Restrictive Diets

Tapioca is grain-free and gluten-free. For the individuals who have issues with gluten sensitivity, they can use the tapioca flour when they are making bread. The flour is also suitable for vegans. It is also used by individuals who are following the paleo diet.

2. Promotes Gut Health

Tapioca usually acts as a source of resistant starch. The resistant starch will pass through the small intestine, and it will not be digested. Instead, it will ferment in the large intestine and act as a food source for the healthy gut bacteria.

Some researchers have managed to look into different types of resistant starch over the years. There are currently speculations that resistant starch may come in handy while preventing colon cancer, among other diseases.

3. Tapioca Helps to Lower Blood Sugar

Resistant starch usually has an impact on blood sugar levels. Some studies have showcased that the resistant starch comes in handy by lowering the blood glucose levels in instances whereby the standard starch was replaced with the tapioca based food.

Researchers are also looking into how resistant starch plays a role in managing obesity and diabetes. The research is not yet conclusive, which means we are yet to understand the relationship between diabetes and resistant starch.

4. Helps to Prevent Iron-Deficiency Anemia

In some nations, iron deficiency anemia is somewhat prevalent. Some of the issues related to iron deficiency anemia include infant mortality, congenital disabilities, low immunity, and impaired cognitive function. A single serving of tapioca will provide a significant amount of iron.

5. Helps to Promote Breast Milk Production

Starchy foods usually boost milk production when a nursing mom is breastfeeding. Tapioca is a good source of energy and starch. Some journals have been published over the years, and they have showcased that cassava helps increase the breastmilk supply. If you are currently breastfeeding, feel free to consume tapioca and witness its health benefits firsthand.

Proper Protein Intake on a Plant-Based Diet

When someone begins a plant-based diet, the first question they have is how to get enough protein. The answer is there is plenty of protein in a well-rounded plant-based diet. All plant foods are a complete protein, which means they have all essential amino acids.

The Proper Amount of Protein

We’ve been told that we need huge amounts of protein to be big and strong, and that isn’t true. All anyone has to do is look up plant-based athletes and bodybuilders to see that.

There are formulas that show us how much protein we need. The recommended daily amount (RDA) is 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight or 0.36 grams of protein per pound of body weight.

This comes out to 65 grams of protein for an average 180-pound man, and for a 140-pound woman, 50 grams of protein per day. It is easy to get this much protein eating a plant-based diet.

Active people might need more than the RDA amounts. If a person lifts weights or does any type of serious exercise routine, they need about 1.3 to 1.7 grams per kilogram of body weight or 0.54 to 0.77 grams per pound.

Getting Enough Protein On a Plant-Based Diet

As long as you eat enough calories, you will get plenty of protein. A well-rounded plant-based diet will include beans, legumes, lentils, whole grains, potatoes, oats, quinoa, seeds, nuts, and fruit.

There are studies that show protein from plant foods is healthier than getting protein from meat. Red meat can raise the risk of certain cancers, and all meat is high in saturated fat. Meat contains no fiber or phytonutrients, while plant-based foods have plenty of healthy fiber and immune system boosting phytonutrients.

Some plant-based foods and their protein amounts include:

  • 1 cup of tempeh has 31 grams of protein
  • 1 cup of tofu has 20g
  • 1 cup of lentils has 18g
  • All types of beans and peas range from 13 to 15g
  • 1 cup of rolled oats has 11g
  • 1 cup of quinoa has 8g

Unless someone has a diet of only lettuce and fruit, they will get more than enough protein eating a plant-based diet.

This article was originally published on ZeeshanHoodbhoy.com

Tips To Help You Avoid Eating Late At Night

Eating late at night is a bad habit that many people often succumb to. Sometimes it’s due to the hours they work or perhaps they’re just night owls. Many people become bored late at night and choose to eat in order to fill the boredom. Whatever the reason is, late night snacking can be detrimental in a myriad of ways. It can be difficult to kick this bad habit but it’s more than possible to do so if you have perseverance. Here are a few tips to help you avoid eating late at night.

Figure Out Triggers

One reason people choose to eat late at night is because of some sort of trigger in their life. Perhaps they’re bored, or maybe they see a commercial for a food they love. It can be hard to avoid these triggers but if you can figure out exactly what triggers you, you’ll have an easier time keeping it under control. For example, if there’s a certain snack you find yourself repeatedly eating late at night, you may want to avoid stocking that item in your home. If you’re consistently seeing a commercial for your favorite late night take out, perhaps think about doing something where you can’t see that commercial at that hour, such as reading a book.

Create A Meal Schedule

Another reason people end up late night snacking is due to having irregular eating habits throughout the day. Perhaps you avoid eating much throughout the day and then eat a large dinner, thinking you won’t be hungry again late at night. If you’re someone like this, try creating and following a consistent meal schedule of three balanced meals throughout your day. If done daily, your hunger later at night will not be as strong, and then you’ll wake up feeling hungry and ready to eat your first meal of the day.

Get Plenty of Sleep

Eating late at night can also be linked to not getting enough sleep. If you work a regular 9 to 5 and are up late at night, that may be the reason you eat late at night. While this may seem obvious, the fact that you’re up late at night may be you mistaking tiredness for hunger. Instead, try going to sleep earlier and ensuring you’re getting 7 to 9 hours of sleep each night. This may help you get that late night snacking under control.

 

This article was originally published on ZeehanHoobhoy.com

Tips For Eating Healthy During Quarantine

The world has been quite different since most people across the globe have gone into quarantine as a way to flatten the curve with the novel coronavirus pandemic. Many of us have been stuck in our homes and have lost our jobs, meaning it can be difficult to keep up with many of the healthy habits we stuck with prior to all of this. This means the struggle of eating healthy is more present than ever, especially with supply shortages of various kinds throughout the country and the stress that comes with being stuck at home, losing your job, and worrying for your own health and the health of your loved ones. Here are a few ways you can try and stick to eating healthy while stuck at home.

Have An Eating Schedule

Before the quarantine began, most of the country would have set schedules. We’d wake up at the same time everyday, go to work at the same time and even eat at certain times. Now that we’re stuck at home, a lot of that has gone out the door. Sure, there are plenty of people who are still working from home, but regardless of that, it can be difficult to actually stick to a schedule when you’re not actively moving from your home, to your workplace, and back throughout the day. It’s important to eat at least 3 meals a day, and that you try and have those 3 meals around the same time each day. If you’ve got a family, it can be a daily family activity to prepare and eat your meals together.

Be Careful Of Snacking

Since you’ll be stuck at home much more often, snacking is inevitable. It’s important that if you’re going to snack, you snack on healthy foods. Stock up on fresh fruit or generally healthier snacks as opposed to buying yourself chips, cookies and other unhealthy things. It’s also important to drink plenty of water as opposed to soda or other sugary drinks. Most importantly, learn to identify when you’re actually hungry or if you’re just thirsty. Sometimes eating seems like the best way to pass the time when bored, and that can become an extremely unhealthy habit very quickly.

Get Plenty Of Vitamin C

Our immune system’s are extremely important, especially during times like this. A great way to make sure you take care of your immune system is by ingesting plenty of Vitamin C. Orange juice is a great source of Vitamin C, but you can also eat strawberries, broccoli, kiwi, and plenty of other fruits and vegetables.

This article was originally published on Zeehanhoodbhoy.com

4 Healthy Foods to Help Fight Depression

Every now and then, life’s pressures can have you feeling down. More often than not, your diet can also be a big factor. If you are ever feeling sad, anxious, or depressed, your diet can either be the cause or the solution. Food fuels our bodies and our minds, so it’s important to pay attention to what you are eating. Here are the five healthy foods you should try when you’re feeling depressed:

Omega-3s

The best mood-boosting food you can consume when you are struggling with depression are foods rich in omega-3s. Many studies have shown foods rich in omega-3s may have a role in brain functioning and those who are deficient in omega-3s are more like to have mental health problems. Foods that are rich in omega-3s are salmon, sardines, anchovies, walnuts, chia seeds, canola oil, and more.

Probiotics

When people think of upping the probiotic levels, they mainly think of their digestive health. However, probiotics have been shown to have a wonderful effect on mental health. It’s been shown that bacteria in the gut sends and receives signals to the brain, which means when your gut is healthy, your mind is healthy. Foods rich in probiotics are yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, miso, and tempeh.

Whole Grains

Another type of food that is good for the body and mind are whole grains. Whole grains are packed with sources of B vitamins which is very important for brain health. B vitamins such as B1, B5, B6, and B12 are linked to energy levels, learning and memory, and regulating your mood. To up your whole grains intake, try foods such as steel-cut oats, wild rice, brown rice, quinoa, and bulgur.

Leafy Green Vegetables

Ever since you were little, you were probably told to always eat your vegetables, and for good reason. Eating leafy green vegetables offers many amazing benefits for the mind and body. These vegetables contain B vitamin folate which is super important for aiding in mental health. It has been found that low folate levels are associated with depression, which is why it’s important to keep these levels up by eating spinach, edamame, lentils, avocado, broccoli, artichokes, and more.

Healthy Foods Worth Buying in Bulk

Buying in bulk saves a lot of money, but it can be challenging to use up bulk purchases of food before they spoil. However, it gets a lot easier when you focus on healthy, unprocessed foods that do not spoil as quickly as other items like bread, ice cream, or cheese.

Bulk purchases of dried beans, nuts, grains, and seeds can last for years, so people always have healthy and affordable food options. Dietitian Rachel Dickens has five healthy foods she encourages her clients to buy in bulk.

Almonds

There are all sorts of ways to use almonds in meals, including grinding them into a keto-friendly breading, eating them as a snack, or making one’s own almond butter. Getting small tins of almonds can be prohibitively expensive, but purchasing in bulk makes them a lot more affordable.

Rice

Low in calories and high in fiber, rice is an extremely affordable side dish when people buy it in bulk. Skip processed white rice and select black or brown rice instead. These versions of rice contain more fiber, so they keep people full longer and help maintain intestinal health.

Dried Chickpeas

Dried chickpeas last longer than canned, and they are also less likely to be contaminated by BPAs and other chemicals. Cooking dried chickpeas is as simple as soaking them in water, tossing them in a pot with boiling water, and forgetting them for an hour. The end result is soft, fluffy chickpeas that can be made into hummus, salad, falafel, and other tasty meals.

Pumpkin Seeds

Pumpkin seeds are an ideal way to get zinc, but they tend to be pricey when purchased in bags of mixed nuts. Getting them in bulk is ideal because pepitas do not go bad quickly. They can be sprinkled on a variety of sweet and savory food to make sure people get enough nutrition.

Lentils

Dried lentils do not require a long soaking time like other legumes, and they are a great source of fiber and protein. All you have to do is let them simmer for a little while. There are all sorts of ways to use lentils, including stirring them into soups, making an India curry, or tossing chilled lentils in a salad.

Healthy and Energizing Breakfast Ideas

One of the most known sayings when talking about health and nutrition is that “breakfast is the most important meal of the day”. There is a reason why so many people put effort into their first meal of the day and what makes it so important. Breakfast provides us our energy for starting the day and it helps frame the rest of our healthy eating habits for later meals.

By starting off with healthy choices, you are more likely to make healthier choices throughout the day. Here are some healthy and energizing breakfast ideas to start your day off right:

Southwest Egg Scramble

Eggs is a breakfast staple and a protein-packed food that is great for starting off your day.  The Southwest Egg Scramble is super is easy to make, takes almost no time at all, and is budget-friendly. What’s great about this recipe is that it’s super simple to make it your own and to use up veggies or ingredients before they go bad. Plus you can make it just for yourself and for the whole family.

Peanut Butter and Fruit Wrap

If you are looking for a healthy breakfast on the go for you and your kids, this is the perfect solution. These Peanut Butter and Fruit Wraps can be made the night ahead to ensure your breakfast is ready when you’re running late or don’t have time to make meal before work or school. With this recipe simply spread some peanut butter on a tortilla or wrap the add on fruits like strawberries, raspberries, bananas, apples, or blueberries.

Maple Pecan Quinoa Bowl

For a hardy, sweet, and filling breakfast, start your day with this Maple Pecan Quinoa Bowl. This bowl is packed with complex carbohydrates to help keep you full longer throughout the day. It’s also great for warming you up on chilly mornings. It’s full of simple ingredients that are full of nutrients and is super easy to make at the start of your day or for preparing for the week to come.

Cereal Sundae

What’s better than having dessert for breakfast? This Cereal Sundae is delicious, nutritious, and the perfect recipe for sweetening up your morning. The recipe calls for your favorite cereal and adding in lemon or vanilla greek yogurt to boost fiber and protein then topping it off with some fruit and granola.

The Planetary Diet’s Greatest Benefits

Originally published on ZeeshanHoodbhoy.com

Early this year, an international team of 37 scientists, with specialties ranging from agriculture to nutrition and from health to economics and government, commissioned by the EAT-Lancet Commission published a landmark study that focused on the environmental impacts of various diets. The study concluded that a diet rich with plant-based foods and scarce on animal-sourced products leads to overall improved health and environmental benefits.

The authors of the study offered a warning in their publication: a global change in diet and food production is needed now as it can lead to sustainable food production, reduce further environmental damage, and end the malnourishment of three billion people across the globe, and could result in up to 11 million fewer premature deaths without harming the planet.

Because the world’s population is set to reach 10 billion by 2050, the commissioned scientists warn “current diets are pushing the Earth beyond its planetary boundaries, while causing ill health. This puts both people and the planet at risk.”

After reviewing the results, the commission recommended everyone on the planet to change their diet to 50 percent lower in red meat and sugar than the average western diet and much much more fruits and vegetables.

Dr. Walter Willett, a Harvard University nutrition expert who was part of the commission, stated that the diet they and the commission have suggested “allows flexibility to accommodate various food types, agricultural systems, cultural traditions, and individual dietary preferences, including omnivore, vegetarian, and vegan diets.

Take a look at this example of the precise diet recommended by the Commission that would provide optimal calories and nutrients, based on 2,500 calories per day:

  • 811 calories of whole grains such as rice or wheat
  • 39 calories of starchy vegetables such as potatoes
  • 15 calories of beef or lamb
  • 15 calories of pork
  • 62 calories of poultry
  • 19 calories of egg – about three eggs every two weeks
  • 40 calories of fish
  • 172 calories of beans, lentils or peas
  • 112 calories of soy food
  • 142 calories of peanuts
  • 149 calories of tree nuts
  • 153 calories of dairy
  • 68 calories worth of vegetables
  • 126 calories of fruit
  • 354 calories of unsaturated vegetable oil
  • 60 calories of saturated palm oil
  • No dairy fat at all
  • 36 calories of lard or tallow
  • 120 calories of sweeteners

This diet would include about two small servings of red meat and two servings of fish a week and about one glass a day of fat-free milk.

Based on this diet, all three different analyses done came up with the same projection: millions fewer would die prematurely, and the earth would sustain far less damage.

Healthy and Creative Salad Toppings

When it comes to salads, most have a very black and white idea of how a salad should look: mixed greens, carrots, onions, tomatoes, croutons, cheese, and your favorite dressing. While salads are always a healthy option, adding different toppings throughout the week helps to increase the variety of nutrients gained from the salad and help to “spice” it up.

Check out these top ideas for adding more flavor and nutrition to your salad.

Tofu – For those who have never tried it, it may not be the easiest choice to put it on a salad. But don’t let its uniqueness stop you. Tofu lowers risk for diabetes, obesity and heart disease, while also acting as a versatile topping: grill it for a firmer texture or use it as a mix for an (eggless) egg salad. Did we mention tofu has also been associated with cancer prevention?

Nuts & Seeds – It is no secret that nuts and seeds are loaded with nutrition. However, it is less known how well they go with a salad. Pumpkin and sunflower seeds and walnuts and almonds make for the best salads. Along with the added crunch they provide, nuts and seeds are packed with Omega-3 fats, vitamin E, protein, fiber and more.

Chickpeas – These jack of all trades improves bone, heart, and gut health, as well as improves memory and sleep. Jam-packed with protein, chickpeas are a perfect addition of any salad. All you need is a small handful added to your daily salad!

Avocado – The benefits of eating avocados don’t even need to be mentioned at this point, right? On top of the low-calorie count and the improved blood pressure and cholesterol, avocados are an excellent substitute for that creamy texture often looked for in calorie-loaded dressing.

Berries – Darker berries are known for their superior vitamin and nutrients content, but all berries offer important sources of fiber, vitamin C, and more. Adding these fruits to your salad helps to curb sweet-tooth cravings and helps the body absorb the iron in the greens.

Egg – This salad topping isn’t the most creative, but it does offer benefits for your health. One added hard-boiled egg provides six grams of protein and more than 15 minerals and vitamins at the cost of 77 calories. Add to the fact that they make meals feel more fulfilling and take about ten minutes to cook; they should essentially be a go-to salad topper.

This article was originally published on ZeeshanHoodbhoy.com.