Benefits of Apple-Cider Vinegar

Apple-cider vinegar has been used for centuries as an effective home remedy. It is made from fermented apple juice, and it can be used to treat a variety of ailments, including sinus infections, high blood pressure, diabetes, arthritis, and much more. This article will discuss the benefits of apple cider vinegar in detail.

High in healthful substances

Apple-cider vinegar is filled with healthful substances, including potassium, magnesium, calcium, phosphorous, chlorine, sodium, and sulfur. This vinegar also contains potassium, which is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps control heart rate and blood pressure.

Can help kill harmful bacteria

Apple-cider vinegar is known to help kill harmful bacteria, which can be especially helpful for sinus infections. It also allows our body to absorb nutrients better. This vinegar has antiseptic properties that can help fight infection and germs.

May help lower blood sugar levels and manage diabetes

This vinegar can help lower blood sugar levels. It works by triggering our liver to release glycogen, which is a type of energy storage molecule that the body makes from carbohydrates. When you have diabetes or are pre-diabetic, this substance can get trapped in your liver cells and won’t be released.

Apple-cider vinegar helps break down liver cells so that this glycogen can be released into the blood. This could help lower blood sugar levels and manage diabetes.

May aid weight loss

Apple-cider vinegar contains pectin, a water-soluble dietary fiber that acts as a natural appetite suppressant. It can help remove fat from our body by preventing it from being absorbed during the digestive process. This way, we burn more calories and lose weight faster. It also contains acetic acid, which has been found to help reduce body fat levels.

Improves heart health in animals

Some animal studies have shown that apple cider vinegar may help improve heart health. It works by encouraging the heart to produce an enzyme called endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). This enzyme helps keep our arteries healthy and dilated so blood can flow through them easily. This could be especially helpful for people with heart disease.

May boost skin health

Apple-cider vinegar contains an alpha-hydroxy acid (AHA), a natural exfoliant that can help improve skin health by removing dead cells and promoting cell regeneration. This acid also has antibacterial properties to help fight acne and other skin issues. This vinegar also contains acetic acid, which can help relieve irritation and itching.

This article was originally published on ZeeshanHoodbhoy.com

Simple Tips to Prevent Midlife Weight Gain

Many American’s struggle with weight gain, particularly during their middle-aged years. This can be due to natural changes in the body, more dormant lifestyles, a natural increase in stress as we take on more and more responsibility, and many other factors. But how do people counter gaining weight as they get older? Here are some tips and tricks for naturally keeping a trim figure as you age and avoiding unnecessary weight gain.

Protein, Protein, Protein

One tried and true method to help keep pounds off is by naturally curbing your appetite by increasing the amount of protein in your diet. Protein is an essential macronutrient and is known to keep us feeling more full for longer periods of time. Because of this, you naturally desire to eat less often, putting your daily calories consumed at a lower number. When you burn more calories than you consume in a day, you will naturally lose weight. Adding protein into your diet is an easy way to keep yourself healthy and extra pounds off of your body. You can read more about protein and midlife weight loss here.

Make Sure to Hydrate

One thing that is very commonly overlooked is hydration. Making sure to get enough water during the day can help you to feel full and also helps with almost all of the body’s processes, such as digestion. Talk to your doctor about the appropriate amount of water that you should be drinking per day. Drinking enough water per day has an immeasurable amount of benefits, and will have you looking and feeling your best while at the same time fighting midlife weight gain.

Add in Some Extra Steps

As we age, we tend to be less and less active in our everyday lives. This can lead to overall sedentary lifestyles, which leads to fewer calories burnt throughout the day. Over time, if you continue to eat the same amount of calories as always, while also decreasing the amount of movement that you are doing, you will naturally gain weight. By adding in simple exercises like a light walk or a quick jog before or after work, you can increase your steps and in turn, increase the number of calories that you are burning.

Elderly Nutrition: Important Foods for Seniors

Seniors face a unique set of issues related to diet and metabolism. The World Health Organization reports that a majority of diseases can be blamed on a poor diet lacking sufficient nutrients. That’s why it is so important that seniors, in particular, focus on getting the healthy nutrition they need to live a satisfying and healthy life.

Dietary Guidelines

Broadly speaking, a healthy diet for seniors includes carbohydrate-rich foods, lean protein, and five servings of vegetables and fruits.

Below are recommended foods for seniors to add to their diet.

Lean Protein Choices

Older people don’t absorb protein as easily as they once did when they were younger. AARP recommends five to six ounces of protein each day. Fish is touted as an excellent source of protein since it also provides healthy omega-3 fats and B12. Salmon, tuna, cod, and trout are excellent options.

Poultry, nuts, lean meat, beans, cottage cheese, peas, poultry, and soy products round out a healthy diet for seniors with adequate protein required to maintain muscle mass.

Recommended Vegetables

When selecting vegetables, choosing a variety of colors is advisable. Some highly recommended options are listed below.

  • Dark Leafy Greens
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Kale
  • Spinach
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Swiss Chard
  • Asparagus
  • Collard Greens
  • Ginger

Recommended Fruits

Fruits are an important source of vitamins and minerals. The fiber they provide is also key for maintaining a healthy body. As if that is not enough reason to eat fruit daily, they are also rich in antioxidants.

Below is a list of fruits that seniors should consider incorporating into their diet.

  • Berries
  • Pears
  • Apples
  • Kiwi
  • Oranges
  • Avocado
  • Bananas
  • Grapes
  • Lemons
  • Grapefruit
  • Limes
  • Pineapple

Few scientists, physicians, or dieticians question the link between diet and health. Many chronic ailments are considered to be lifestyle diseases. That’s why it is critical that seniors focus on a healthy diet.

The Best Winter Foods for Staying Healthy

With winter on the doorstep, it’s vital to make sure that you’re eating healthy to keep any illnesses at bay. No one has the time or energy to fall ill with a cold or flu. Many may turn to warm soups and delicious holiday treats during this time of year, but a focus on foods that boost immunity should be prioritized.

  1. Soups
    There are many soups to choose from that are filled to bursting with flavor and nutritious value. Aside from the traditional chicken noodle and tomato varieties, try loaded cauliflower or a classic beef stew loaded with sweet root veggies. Creamy spinach with plenty of garlic or ginger carrot are varieties that your immune system will especially love!
  2. Leafy Greens
    Many children may hate these kinds of vegetables, but equally as many mothers know how important eating these veggies can be! Many are chock full of iron, which is essential to keep your immune system running in tiptop shape. Like spinach, others contain zinc, which is another component needed to ensure any viruses encountered are quickly dispatched.
  3. Citrus Fruits
    For keeping your energy and immunity levels high, go for your citrus fruits! Vitamin C is your friend this time of year. If possible, try to go for fresh fruits over juices. While juices are great in a pinch, they can be loaded with added sugars. They make perfect snacks!
  4. Oatmeal
    Oatmeal is known for keeping your heart healthy, but it can also assist with giving you energy. This breakfast staple is known for making you feel fuller quicker and longer since it is a slow-release food. Enjoying your oats with nuts or fruits can also add more nutrients to your meal to make it an even better way to begin the day!

Wintertime, like any time of year, is full of amazing foods to enjoy. Choosing ones that will keep one healthy is crucial. From oatmeal for breakfast to soups for lunch to veggies and fruits for dinnertime and snacking, you’ll find yourself more resistant to any illnesses lurking around. Do your best to make good winter food choices, and your body will thank you for it.

Is The Zero Carb-diet Right For You?

Most people have been keen on what they take into their bodies lately. A zero-carb diet has become an adaptation for many. They believe that the diet is a magical way of shedding off weight, taming abnormal desire for certain foods, and keeping a healthy body.

A zero-carb diet is not as friendly as other diets that allow you to have scarce starch portions. This diet prohibits any intake of carbohydrates. However, the essence of carbs in the body can’t be ignored since they play a significant role in keeping people’s bodies energetic and ensuring their brains are okay.

Before embracing a zero-carb diet, nutritionists advise people to be gradual on it. Cutting carbohydrates at once could lead to issues like adverse mood swings and low energy levels. Also, they are advised on the essence of understanding their bodies, especially those with conditions.

Despite the many arguments surrounding the zero-carb diet, health specialists have confirmed that it is healthful to stick to the diet. Weight loss is the most significant benefit of this diet. Low carbs are good at getting rid of excess water and reducing the sugar in the body. This action translates to weight loss without extreme feelings of hunger.

Many lifestyle diseases are associated with excess weight. Among them are cardiovascular problems, which may lead to the inability to get involved in many activities. Another common condition attracted by too much weight is diabetes. After digestion, carbohydrates become glucose, which means that too much glucose will increase insulin, which is simply diabetes. Therefore, a zero carb-diet significantly curbs these diseases, thus keeping you healthy.

Generally, experts say that Zero-carb diets are okay for people, especially those with obesity. However, they argue that women that are in the child-bearing stage should go slow on it. The reason for the argument is that a Zero-carb diet might interfere with their reproductive hormones. This interference may lead to a delay in their giving birth or even cause them to be barren.

A zero-carb diet has worked for many people with a few registering manageable side effects. They affirm that the effects are nothing compared to the benefits that come with the diet. Anyone who wants to embark on the diet must avoid baked foods, junks, sugary cereals, grains, and starchy vegetables. However, it’s wise for them to visit a health and nutrition expert for further guidance.

Proper Protein Intake on a Plant-Based Diet

When someone begins a plant-based diet, the first question they have is how to get enough protein. The answer is there is plenty of protein in a well-rounded plant-based diet. All plant foods are a complete protein, which means they have all essential amino acids.

The Proper Amount of Protein

We’ve been told that we need huge amounts of protein to be big and strong, and that isn’t true. All anyone has to do is look up plant-based athletes and bodybuilders to see that.

There are formulas that show us how much protein we need. The recommended daily amount (RDA) is 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight or 0.36 grams of protein per pound of body weight.

This comes out to 65 grams of protein for an average 180-pound man, and for a 140-pound woman, 50 grams of protein per day. It is easy to get this much protein eating a plant-based diet.

Active people might need more than the RDA amounts. If a person lifts weights or does any type of serious exercise routine, they need about 1.3 to 1.7 grams per kilogram of body weight or 0.54 to 0.77 grams per pound.

Getting Enough Protein On a Plant-Based Diet

As long as you eat enough calories, you will get plenty of protein. A well-rounded plant-based diet will include beans, legumes, lentils, whole grains, potatoes, oats, quinoa, seeds, nuts, and fruit.

There are studies that show protein from plant foods is healthier than getting protein from meat. Red meat can raise the risk of certain cancers, and all meat is high in saturated fat. Meat contains no fiber or phytonutrients, while plant-based foods have plenty of healthy fiber and immune system boosting phytonutrients.

Some plant-based foods and their protein amounts include:

  • 1 cup of tempeh has 31 grams of protein
  • 1 cup of tofu has 20g
  • 1 cup of lentils has 18g
  • All types of beans and peas range from 13 to 15g
  • 1 cup of rolled oats has 11g
  • 1 cup of quinoa has 8g

Unless someone has a diet of only lettuce and fruit, they will get more than enough protein eating a plant-based diet.

This article was originally published on ZeeshanHoodbhoy.com

The Planetary Diet’s Greatest Benefits

Originally published on ZeeshanHoodbhoy.com

Early this year, an international team of 37 scientists, with specialties ranging from agriculture to nutrition and from health to economics and government, commissioned by the EAT-Lancet Commission published a landmark study that focused on the environmental impacts of various diets. The study concluded that a diet rich with plant-based foods and scarce on animal-sourced products leads to overall improved health and environmental benefits.

The authors of the study offered a warning in their publication: a global change in diet and food production is needed now as it can lead to sustainable food production, reduce further environmental damage, and end the malnourishment of three billion people across the globe, and could result in up to 11 million fewer premature deaths without harming the planet.

Because the world’s population is set to reach 10 billion by 2050, the commissioned scientists warn “current diets are pushing the Earth beyond its planetary boundaries, while causing ill health. This puts both people and the planet at risk.”

After reviewing the results, the commission recommended everyone on the planet to change their diet to 50 percent lower in red meat and sugar than the average western diet and much much more fruits and vegetables.

Dr. Walter Willett, a Harvard University nutrition expert who was part of the commission, stated that the diet they and the commission have suggested “allows flexibility to accommodate various food types, agricultural systems, cultural traditions, and individual dietary preferences, including omnivore, vegetarian, and vegan diets.

Take a look at this example of the precise diet recommended by the Commission that would provide optimal calories and nutrients, based on 2,500 calories per day:

  • 811 calories of whole grains such as rice or wheat
  • 39 calories of starchy vegetables such as potatoes
  • 15 calories of beef or lamb
  • 15 calories of pork
  • 62 calories of poultry
  • 19 calories of egg – about three eggs every two weeks
  • 40 calories of fish
  • 172 calories of beans, lentils or peas
  • 112 calories of soy food
  • 142 calories of peanuts
  • 149 calories of tree nuts
  • 153 calories of dairy
  • 68 calories worth of vegetables
  • 126 calories of fruit
  • 354 calories of unsaturated vegetable oil
  • 60 calories of saturated palm oil
  • No dairy fat at all
  • 36 calories of lard or tallow
  • 120 calories of sweeteners

This diet would include about two small servings of red meat and two servings of fish a week and about one glass a day of fat-free milk.

Based on this diet, all three different analyses done came up with the same projection: millions fewer would die prematurely, and the earth would sustain far less damage.

Tips to Help Avoid Stress Eating

There’s arguably nothing more satisfying than eating while you are hungry. However, this is not to be confused with stress eating. Stress eating is characterized by consuming food in response to your emotional state rather than simply hunger. Basically, your mood dictates when you eat, and how much you consume in one sitting. This can be an especially unhealthy lifestyle, but there are ways present to combat stress eating. Here are some tips for you to avoid this behavior and return to a normal pattern of food consumption.

Practice Breathing

Taking a deep breath is a powerful tool for you to use in response to stress eating. This is because breathing controls the portion of the brain that controls the flight or fight response that is activated in the sympathetic nervous system. This will help calm you down and the urge to eat or binge should decrease.

Eat With a Conscious

If you eat consciously, it removes all of the rushed nature of stress eating. Take smaller bites and allow yourself to fully appreciate what you are eating. When you become a conscious eater, you will then learn to understand the difference between when you are full and when you are eating for the sake of eating.

Change Your Approach

Believe it or not, stress eating is all about your approach to the situation. Stress eating is predicated on conflicting emotional feelings. This means changing your lifestyle and switching to a healthier diet. Once you do that, you will appreciate the value of indulgence. Unless you are on a specialized diet, stick to foods that are healthy yet filling. The habit of stress eating may slowly wither away as a result.

Examine Your Feelings First

Arguably the most important thing you can do before stress eating is examining your own emotional state beforehand. Self-reflection is an important tool for stress eaters because stress eating is not about what you are eating, but what is going on in your head at the time. Examine if you are breathing correctly. Is your heart racing a bit faster than it should? Observe your thoughts and your physical behavior, and try to slow down.

Stress eating can be difficult to overcome, but these simple steps can help you exponentially.

Increasing Keratin Through Your Dietary Intake

Originally published on ZeeshanHoodbhoy.com

Looking good is just as much about taking care of your body on the inside as it is on the outside. Keratin is a protein that makes up your skin, nails, and hair. It is also found in your internal glands and organs. Keratin is less prone to tearing or scratching compared to any other protein found in the body. It is derived of wool, horn, and feathers of different animals and is often used in hair products. Keratin also strengthens the outer layer of the skin and boosts hair, skin, and nail growth. Keratin treatments and supplements can help strengthen your hair and keep it looking healthier, but there are several ways you can increase your natural keratin by adding certain foods to your diet.

Protein

Start by maintaining a diet that is rich in protein. Protein provides the body with amino acids needed to produce keratin. To prevent heart disease, avoid or limit your intake of fatty red meats. Choose fish, chicken, low-fat dairy, and lean meats instead to boost keratin production and enhance your hair, skin, and nails.

Iron

Foods that are rich in iron help transport oxygen from red blood cells to your hair follicles. Iron is found in animal protein and is easily absorbed by the body. Consume iron-rich foods found in both animal protein and plant foods including duck, turkey, shrimp, eggs, pork, lamb, beans, soybeans, black-eyed peas, lentils, and tofu.

Vitamins

Vitamin C aids in the absorption of vegetarian-based iron. To increase keratin production, eat grapefruit, oranges, papaya, strawberries, peppers, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts at the same time that you eat vegetable-based protein. Vitamin B enhances red blood cells that carry nutrients to your follicles to grow hair. Foods with folate and vitamin B-6 and B-12 include oatmeal, whole-grain cereals, lentils, garbanzo beans, bananas, shellfish, white potatoes, chicken breasts, parsnips, spinach, and beets.

Biotin-Rich Foods

Biotin is essential in metabolizing amino acids that create keratin. It is also useful in strengthening the hair and nails. Dietary sources of biotin are found in raw egg whites, and egg yolks.

Implementing these foods in your diet will affect the growth of new keratin. However, one should not expect immediate results. It can take anywhere from six months to a year for you to see a visible change. Supplements, such as whey protein powder and salon keratin treatments, can help speed things up in some cases.

Fighting Constant Hunger and Maintaining Fitness

It isn’t something many people are proud to admit, but the average caloric intake of Americans today is 20% higher than it was in 1970, and more often than not, our average meals greatly exceed those of other countries in terms of size. So, why is it that many of us are so hungry so frequently? While excessive eating could certainly be a factor, it’s excessive snacking that seems to be our nutritional downfall.

According to personal trainer Sam Wood, there are various reasons why many people find it difficult to suppress their appetites throughout the day. From a sociological standpoint, we’ve been conditioned to believe that more is better when eating. Our average portion sizes as Americans are much larger than what is recommended by health professionals. Even worse, the actual food on our plates is not always what our bodies need.

One prominent issue that has taken the dietary world by storm is the notion that highly caloric foods are unhealthy. Believing this eliminates healthier fats and great sources of protein from one’s diet, seeing as both have higher calorie contents. Carbohydrates are another group of important nutrients that have been cast in a bad light as well, albeit they should be complex carbs and not processed. Complex carbs come with fiber, vitamins, and minerals. The goal is to feel comfortably full for as long as possible. Healthy fats, foods rich in protein, and complex carbs will do just that.

The time of day at which you eat could also be beneficial (or detrimental) as well. For example, intermittent fasting allows you to eat all your daily foods within an 8-hour window, thus preventing you from snacking late at night, or eating too early, then feeling hungry again before 10:00 a.m. Though this may sound challenging, there are some helpful rules to abide by:

  • Never eat when bored or due to emotions
  • Meal prep
  • Grocery shop once a week
  • Shoot for 21 meals a week

Sticking to one strict routine can prove challenging. Don’t feel as though this is the key to optimal fitness. Changing it up can actually be highly beneficial. For example, some of the most common breakfast foods include bagels, cereal, white toast, etc., all of which are high in carbs that lead to you quickly feeling hungry soon after. More filling foods like eggs, greek yogurt, quinoa can have you feeling fuller longer, while also giving you a protein boost early in your day.

Finding a diet that works for you is exactly that; one that is personal. Results will more than likely vary from person to person, but following these general guidelines could be very helpful.